harley primary cover torque sequence

The Ultimate Guide to the Harley Primary Cover Torque Sequence

Hey there, Harley enthusiasts. If you’re looking to tighten up your covers like a pro, you’ve come to the right place. We’re going to break down the Harley primary cover torque sequence you need to know, along with some insider tips and tricks to keep your ride running smoothly.

Follow along as we guide you through the torque sequence and get your Harley running like a well-oiled machine. Remember, it’s all about that 2, 7, 10, 5, and 12 o’clock pattern, baby.

If you haven’t already read our article on ideal torque specs, make sure you check that out here, before getting into the torque sequence.

The 5-Point Star Torque Sequence

Let’s dive right into the torque sequence. The sequence is 2, 7, 10, 5, and 12 o’clocks. This is similar to the pattern you’d use when tightening lug nuts on a wheel with five studs. It’s essential to follow this pattern to ensure even pressure and avoid any potential damage to your ride.

Pro tip: Use blue Loctite for added security. The service manual recommends this, and it helps to keep those screws in place.

Derby Cover Torque Tips

Now, if we’re talking about the derby cover, things are a bit different. Hand tightening and blue Loctite are all you need. Some manuals (like my ’08) have the wrong torque values listed, and you can easily strip the threads out if you follow the manual.

For the round derby cover, a crisscross pattern like you’re making a star shape is the way to go. This helps distribute the pressure evenly and prevents any damage.

Alternative Method – Bolt Installation Breakdown

When installing the primary cover and gasket onto the left crankcase half, you’ll want to use mounting screws in the proper sequence. The bolts have to be installed size by size, as follows:

  1. 1/4-20 x 1-3/4 in. bolt with washers (7)
  2. 1/4-20 x 2-1/4 in. bolt with washers (4)

By installing the bolts in this order, you’re ensuring that everything is properly tightened and secure.

Torque It Up, Harley Style

There you have it. Now you know the correct torque sequence for your Harley’s primary cover. By following the 2, 7, 10, 5, and 12 o’clock pattern, along with using blue Loctite and proper bolt installation, you’ll keep your ride running smoothly and looking sharp.

So, what are you waiting for? Go ahead and torque up that primary cover like a boss. Just remember to follow the sequence and use the right bolts. Happy riding, folks.

FAQs

Below are some frequently asked questions on Harley primary cover torque sequence:

What is the Harley primary cover torque sequence?

The torque sequence is 2, 7, 10, 5, and 12 o’clocks. This pattern is similar to tightening lug nuts on a wheel with five studs.

What should I use to secure the screws in place?

The service manual recommends using blue Loctite to help keep the screws in place and secure.

What is the Harley primary cover torque sequence for the derby cover?

For the derby cover, hand tightening and blue Loctite are all you need. The round derby cover should be tightened in a crisscross pattern, like making a star shape.

What is the proper bolt installation for the primary cover and gasket?

The bolts should be installed size by size as follows:
1/4-20 x 1-3/4 in. bolt with washers (7)
1/4-20 x 2-1/4 in. bolt with washers (4)
This ensures that everything is properly tightened and secure for your Harley’s primary cover.

How important is the Harley primary cover torque sequence?

Following the correct torque sequence is crucial for maintaining even pressure, preventing damage, and ensuring the longevity of your ride. Neglecting the proper sequence can lead to uneven pressure, causing damage or even stripping the threads.

Can I use a different Loctite product instead of blue Loctite?

While blue Loctite is recommended by the service manual, other thread-locking products can work as well. Just ensure you choose a product designed for the specific application and follow the manufacturer’s recommendations.

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